Il était une fois une chips …

Online course from O’Reilly on Processing and Arduino

Posted in Non classé by albertine on juillet 29, 2010

O’Reilly Media (the publisher of MAKE), in partnership with creativeLIVE, has just announced a new online course, Processing and Arduino in Tandem: Creating Your Own Digital Art Tools:

Create your own drawing and animation software-and learn basic programming and electronics skills at the same time. This engaging 5-week online course introduces you to two simple tools: Processing, a programming language for visual thinkers, and Arduino, a hardware platform for working with electronics. You’ll learn how to use these tools together to build something useful right away.
You don’t need programming or electronics experience to get started. Processing is easy to learn, and you’ll get to know Arduino with a starter kit. You’ll also have direct access to the instructor via online Q&A during the workshop. And here’s the best part: the courses are free. It’s a fun and inspiring way for designers, artists, and beginning programmers to learn basic graphics programming.

The course is free if you watch it live, and the video of the course is available for purchase ($89 for all five sessions, but the price is reduced to $49 until September 28, 2010). There is a project kit available for sale as well.

Schedule: Tuesdays @ 3 p.m. Pacific Time
August 31 – September 28, 2010
Each session is 90-120 minutes

Online Course: Processing and Arduino in Tandem

source : http://blog.makezine.com/archive/2010/07/online_course_from_oreilly_on_proce.html

et si on faisait des objets qui évitent de tomber, qui évitent d’être mouillés ou tout simplement qui nous évitent

Posted in avec des si ... by albertine on juillet 22, 2010

Electronics that come to life, avoid danger

from MAKE Magazine by Matt Mets

voir la video

Designers Chambers Judd developed this whimsical series of objects that avoid dust, spills, and touch. [via core77]

source : http://blog.makezine.com/archive/2010/07/electronics_that_come_to_life_avoid.html

et si les visages étaient trackés

Posted in avec des si ... by albertine on juillet 15, 2010

Created by Blake Foster, Rui Wang, and Erik Learned-Miller

The human eye is amazingly adept at tracking moving objects. The process is so natural to humans that it happens without any conscious effort. While this remarkable ability depends in part on the human brain’s immense processing power, the fast response of the extraocular muscles and the eyeball’s light weight are also vital. Even a small point and shoot camera mounted on a servo is typically too heavy and slow to move with the agility of the human eye. How, then, can we give a computer the ability to track movement quickly and responsively?

Thanks to recent progress in camera miniaturization, small, easily manipulable cameras are now readily available. In this project, we use a first person view (FPV) camera intended for use on model airplanes. The camera is mounted on servo motors which can aim the camera with two degrees of freedom. The entire assembly weighs only 32 grams, only slightly more than a typical human eyeball. Coupled with a GPU-based tracking algorithm, the FPV camera allows the computer to robustly track a wide array of patterns and objects with excellent speed and stability.

The above video clip shows a short demonstration. We built a simple camera tracking system using the FPV camera. The video demonstrates how the tracking camera snaps to a person moving in front of it. We show both the view captured by the tracking camera (the smaller video), and the view from a different camera that shows the movement of the tracking camera (the larger video).

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